Becoming a Missionary

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What is a missions mobilizer?

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A missions mobilizer is one who informs others about the need for missions work and what is being done to meet the needs, as well as motivates others to get involved, either through prayer, giving or going. Go To Nations offers an Associate Missionary status for missions mobilizers who work a full-time job and do … Learn More »

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What is the difference between missions agencies and missions ministries?

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A is an organization that serves the missionary who does the work of the ministry globally. For GTN, those services include: Donor services Payroll Reporting Training Member care Field oversight Trouble shooting Resource and development for project work Marketing and representation to the greater public Tools for growth Intentional leadership design that promotes a sense … Learn More »

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How does someone join Go To Nations?

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In order to become a missionary with GTN: Attend a 6-day training course and interviews at Go To Nations’ world headquarters Receive a confirmation from the Go To Nations leadership regarding the candidate’s preparedness and calling Receive strong recommendations, including a pastoral recommendation from the candidate’s home church A clean FBI nationwide background check Be … Learn More »

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Is there a way I can receive actual on-site missionary training to determine if I want to be a missionary?

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Yes. Through Go To Nations’ 10 1/2 weeks field internship, the Timothy Internship Program, offered in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; Peten, Guatemala; or Iloilo, Philippines. Missionary interns receive college level training in mission skill sets. Also there are daily and weekly applications of what they are learning in class, and gleaning from veteran missionaries to help … Learn More »

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What is the relationship of a missions agency to the missionary’s home church?

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There are many agencies that provide a variety of different services to both the missionary and the local church. Go To Nations partners with the home church in validating, equipping and sending their missionary, as well as providing the field oversight for accountability and productivity – while insuring the missionary’s well-being. The home church shares … Learn More »

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Should the church send their missionary candidate through a missions agency?

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Most churches do not have the staff or resources to evaluate, train, fund and oversee the health, well-being and expansion of work in the nation where the missionary is serving. Go To Nations is a para-church organization that comes alongside the local church to help them fulfill the . There are some mega-churches that have … Learn More »

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How can a church validate someone’s missionary call?

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Paul says to know those that labor among you. The church should know the missionary candidate that they are recommending for missions service. They should be able to vouch for their faith walk, character and wholeness, their ministry and work ethics, relationship with Christ, as well as, how they work with the body of Christ … Learn More »

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How is my church involved with me becoming a missionary?

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Jesus gave the to the church. Therefore, the church is the seedbed where missionaries come from. The church has the responsibility of discipling the missionary candidate and providing ministry experience. Also in training and equipping them in ministry within the local church, providing counseling and healing in areas of brokenness, and in evaluating and validating … Learn More »

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How can I find out everything it takes to become a missionary?

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Finding out everything that it takes to become a missionary is a journey. Start by Reading these FAQ’s. Go To Nations has over 100 cumulative years of missions experience invested in developing our Equipping Track for new missionaries, because we understand the gravity of getting it right. We also recommend that you talk with your … Learn More »

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How do missionaries educate their children on the mission field?

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Some missionaries home school their children, while others send their children to an English speaking private school. Some will even go to a national school where the children will only speak the native language in classes. If they do send their children to the national public school, the parents often supplement the curriculum with English, … Learn More »